OUTPUTS (BPS)

Examples of information that companies can find out about customers...

Outputs for companies give further insight into the reasons behind various attitudes, beliefs and behaviours of customers similar to their own personality score.

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Are they Market Mavens?


Goldsmith and Flynn found that openness is related positively to market mavenism, or a wish to acquire detailed knowledge about consumer products and services, a wish to stay on top of trends in these, and a willingness to share this knowledge and information with others. Given that they are cautious about change and unusual ideas they generally prefer tried and tested products and brands, and eschew the cutting edge. Of course the bad side of this is that they miss out on the ‘latest and greatest’. If they are not confident in their own judgements they will find themselves asking the advice of others and relying on their guidance. On the plus side, however, they do not even feel the motivation to spend hours learning about new products, as they do not feel as though they are missing out on anything. They are not exposed to the same flaws in product design as some people, who jump on the latest bandwagon, and instead they benefit from the reliability and lower prices associated with tried and tested products.

Goldsmith and Flynn found that extraversion is related positively to market mavenism, or a wish to acquire detailed knowledge about consumer products and services, a wish to stay on top of trends in these, and a willingness to share this knowledge and information with others. Their extravert manner means they find it easy to talk to other people, and their gregarious nature in particular can make their evangelic approach all the more convincing to others, as enthusiastic displays of excitement come easily to they. Remember that to people who are not themselves extravert, a lively and gregarious approach can feel intimidating. If they really want to sell an introvert on a new product or service then they should keep their enthusiasm in check, be calm, focus on facts, and when they’ve presented the information back off and give them the chance to ask questions.

Goldsmith and Flynn found that agreeableness is related positively to market mavenism, or a wish to acquire detailed knowledge about consumer products and services, a wish to stay on top of trends in these, and a willingness to share this knowledge and information with others. It is easy to see why people who score high for agreeableness are prone to also being market mavens. Their affable, empathic nature means that they are happy to help others, and if they have a particular interest in a certain area (for example through their job or a hobby) they may see it as almost their duty to assist friends, family, and even complete strangers at a time when they are making a decision on something where they have expertise. Motivated by a desire to make others feel at ease and interest in them, they are happy to devote time to learning about products and services, and to spend time with people talking them through the options so that they reach a decision that is right for their own needs. Their kind-hearted wish to help others might sometimes backfire though, since not everyone will want to benefit from their (well-intended) expertise. Instead they might want to completely make up their own mind. Since they’re concerned about the feelings of others they will be happy to accommodate this.




What kind of entertainment do they like?


A team of researchers led by Rentfrow found that openness is related to preferences for three different types of entertainment media. Their relatively low level of openness means they are less likely than most to enjoy ‘aesthetic’ entertainment media. This means that on TV they are less likely than most to enjoy shows concerning the arts and humanities, mysteries, and educational shows; books about art, poetry, philosophy, architecture, history, science and nature, biographies, academic books, and great works of literature; foreign, independent, and classic movies, as well as musicals and documentaries. They are also less likely than most to enjoy ‘cerebral’ entertainment media. This means that on TV they are less likely than most to enjoy shows about business, health, news and current affairs, science, home improvement, society and culture, and educational shows; and books about business, news and current affairs, medicine, computers, health, and biographies; and to enjoy watching documentaries at the cinema. They are also less likely than most to enjoy ‘dark’ entertainment media such as horror TV shows and late night talk shows; books about horror and the erotic; and movies concerning horror and the erotic as well as cult movies. Their unwillingness to use leisure time to focus on new experiences and new ideas means that they focus on more tried and tested forms of entertainment media. It is ok to let someone else filter through the new material for something good, whereas their emphasis on long-running and well-established shows and genres means that they are watching and reading the cream of the crop.




In what kinds of situations will they daily find themselves in?


A team of researchers led by Rauthmann found that conscientiousness is related to the kind of situations in which they find themselves in daily life. Specifically, they regularly come into contact with situations that feature a strong component of duty: these situations involve a job that needs to be done, somewhere in which they are being counted on to do something, a task in which minor details are important, or in which rational thinking is required. It goes without saying that this continual level of responsibility has the potential to be wearing, and they may long to find themselves more regularly in situations in which not only can they let their hair down a little but in which there is less pressure on them to perform.




What kinds of behaviours are they more likely to do?


Chapman and Goldberg found that extraversion was related to the frequency with which they are likely to have undertaken a number of specific and mundane behaviours within the past year. Specifically, their high extraversion means that within the past year they are more likely than most to have participated in an exercise programme, been jogging, drunk in a bar, talked on a mobile phone, played golf, discussed ways to make money, cheered loudly at a sports event, decorated a room, and used a sauna or hot tub. Within the past year they are also more likely to have drunk hard liquor, driven while talking on a mobile phone, told a dirty joke, and tried to get a sun tan.




How do they manage conflict in the workplace?


Research by Antonioni found that extraversion is related to the style by which managers attempt to resolve conflict in the workplace. Their high extraversion pushes them towards using Antonioni’s integrating style of conflict resolution. Their extraversion means that they have the social skills and the wish to work closely with other people in helping them to resolve conflicts: when the situation gets tense they are usually able to defuse it with a well-timed joke or observation. They are also sufficiently assertive and confident to not be afraid of addressing conflict directly, or afraid of encouraging all concerned to state clearly what they want even when this brings two people onto a collision course. Although their extraversion helps them to use the integrating style of conflict resolution, it can be very time-consuming as it relies on them obtaining a detailed understanding of what everyone is looking for and then developing a resolution that addresses all these concerns.

Research by Antonioni found that agreeableness is related to the style by which managers attempt to resolve conflict in the workplace. Their high agreeableness pushes them towards using Antonioni’s integrating style of conflict resolution. Their concern with cooperation and with being generous and considerate naturally disposes them towards taking an integrating style to conflict resolution in which they seek an outcome that is beneficial for all concerned. Their agreeableness also pushes them away from using what Antonioni called a dominating style. They rarely seek to ensure simply that they win a conflict and that their opponent loses. They are uncomfortable with ignoring the consequences of a conflict resolution for the other person concerned and with winning simply by exerting their power over others. Their agreeableness also means that they are more likely to use Antonioni’s avoiding style of conflict resolution. They have a strong preference to avoid interpersonal conflict and may defer to others to achieve this. Of course this also leads them towards avoiding conflict resolution because they know that engaging in this will involve some degree of turbulence between the individuals concerned.




Who do they trust?


Research by Freitag and Bauer found that openness is related to trust in friends and strangers. Their low openness pushes them away from trusting both friends and strangers. They are not prepared to take risks and unwilling to consider new ideas, and so have concerns about trusting people. There are no weaknesses with this approach, since their unwillingness to trust others may well be appropriate.

Research by Freitag and Bauer found that conscientiousness is related to trust in friends and strangers. Their high conscientiousness pushes them away from trusting both friends and strangers. They are rational, organised, and generally the kind of person who ‘thinks things through’ before acting. They are unlikely to place blind faith in people, but to instead think carefully about the individuals concerned and whether they have the integrity to deserve their trust. There are no weaknesses with this approach, since their unwillingness to trust others may well be appropriate, and instead their trust is based on a careful evaluation of the person concerned.




What kinds of mobile apps do they like?


Research led by Xu found that conscientiousness is related to the likelihood of using certain types of smartphone apps. Their conscientiousness means that they have a high level of motivation to perform well at work and in their other duties, and that they have a good deal of self-control and self-discipline. This explains why they are less likely than most to use leisure-related apps concerning for example music and photography, and also less likely to use personalisation apps that allow them to change their wallpaper, ringtones, and other settings: they probably regard apps like these as distractions (at least during the working day). They’re missing out on a lot of fun, although they probably don’t mind.





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